Author Posts

August 18, 2015 at 2:10 pm EST

As a non profit practitioner based in the education sector in Yemen, I would be interested in any insights on M&E in conflict areas, particularly involving the use of mobile phones in areas that monitoring teams have difficulty in accessing. Do you have any examples of ways in which mobile technologies have been used for remote participatory M&E?

August 21, 2015 at 2:54 pm EST

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have been of increasing interest for use in development/peacebuilding programming over the past few years. The duality of potential to collect information without the same logistical constraints and ability to sync and process data more readily makes ICTs a favorable approach, especially in conflict. Some recent resources that may be of interest to you are:

1) The DFID paper on ICTs for Monitoring & Evaluation of Peacebuilding Programs

This document explores the incorporation of ICTs into the monitoring and evaluation systems of peacebuilding programs. It introduces the reader to the breadth and depth of new technologies, exploring the application of the following ICTs: mobile technology, social media, big data, the digitization of surveys, and tools to better visualize data.

2) M&E Thursday Talk presenting the DFID paper

3) From the Rockefeller Foundation, Emerging Opportunities: Monitoring and Evaluation in a Tech-Enabled World

This is a review of how ICT-enabled technologies are already being applied in program monitoring and in survey research. It also reviews areas where ICTs are starting to be applied in program evaluation and identify new areas in which new technologies can potentially be applied. The technologies discussed include hand-held devices for quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis, data quality control, GPS and mapping devices, environmental monitoring, satellite imaging and big data.

The UNICEF Peacebuilding, Education, and Advocacy programme also has worked with partners to utilize ICTs in some interesting ways, including using tablets for surveys to build a more comprehensive and rapid collection conflict analysis. More information on PBEA findings and use of ICTs can be found here.

Hope that’s helpful!

October 9, 2015 at 8:25 pm EST

Recently, a working group on international ICT professionals have been convening to expand on a set of nine Principles of Digital Development which came about in 2012. They have been exploring how to identify and overcome barriers to the principles’ success in ICT for Development. This looks like a good resource for  you, Mhabeni, as you work out how to best utilize mobile phone technology for M&E. I’m outlining the principles bellow but their website has numerous resources for each principle. This working group is set to release a report on in January 2016 which will include case studies. This community is extremely open and collaborative so it might be worth keeping track of their endeavors.

1. Design with the User

2. Understand the Existing Ecosystem

3. Design for Scale

4. Build for Sustainability

5. Be Data Driven

6. Use Open Standards, Open Data, Open Source, and Open Innovation

7. Reuse and Improve

8. Address Privacy & Security

9. Be Collaborative

October 9, 2015 at 8:26 pm EST

Recently, a working group of international ICT professionals have been convening to expand on a set of nine Principles of Digital Development which came about in 2012. They have been exploring how to identify and overcome barriers to the principles’ success in ICT for Development. This looks like a good resource for  you, Mhabeni, as you work out how to best utilize mobile phone technology for M&E. I’m outlining the principles bellow but their website has numerous resources for each. This working group is set to release a report on in January 2016 which will include case studies. This community is extremely open and collaborative so it might be worth keeping track of their endeavors.

1. Design with the User

2. Understand the Existing Ecosystem

3. Design for Scale

4. Build for Sustainability

5. Be Data Driven

6. Use Open Standards, Open Data, Open Source, and Open Innovation

7. Reuse and Improve

8. Address Privacy & Security

9. Be Collaborative

 

November 9, 2015 at 2:04 am EST

Thank you, Rebecca and Francis, for the information and resources. The DFID paper and the nine principles were both particularly helpful. Apologies for the belated response – I read what you wrote in the email notification I received, but it took me a while to get back to this forum and retrieve my login credentials!