Pilot Test of a Violence-Prevention Curriculum among High School Students in Port-au- Prince, Haiti: Baseline Evaluation Survey Report
June 18, 2014
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Executive Summary

1. Levels of dating violence were high. Approximately 98 percent of students had experienced some form of psychological dating violence victimization. Three out of four students had experienced some form of physical/sexual violence victimization. Ninety-four percent of students reported some type of psychological dating violence perpetration while 63 percent reported some physical/sexual dating violence perpetration.

2. Eighty-seven percent of students had some level of acceptance of dating violence norms. Holding attitudes that were more accepting of dating violence predicted psychological dating violence victimization, physical/sexual dating violence victimization, psychological dating violence perpetration and physical/sexual dating violence perpetration.

3. There were high levels of agreement with gender stereotypes. For example, two out of three students agreed that in a dating relationship, the boy should be smarter than the girl. Gender stereotyping was higher among males than females and was associated with increased psychological dating violence victimization and increased physical/sexual dating violence perpetration.

4. Students in control schools had worse responses to anger than those in treatment schools. Destructive responses to anger put students at greater risk of psychological dating violence victimization, physical/sexual dating violence victimization, psychological dating violence perpetration and physical/sexual dating violence perpetration.

5. At least one in five students believed that there was some positive consequence of dating violence. Perceiving more positive consequences of dating violence predicted psychological dating violence victimization, physical/sexual dating violence victimization, psychological dating violence perpetration and physical/sexual dating violence perpetration.

6. Thirty-five percent of students surveyed were aware of community services for dating abuse perpetrators while 44 percent were aware of services for dating abuse victims.

7. There was less belief in need for help for perpetrators as compared to help for victims. Eighty-three percent of students believed that victims of dating violence needed help whereas 69 percent believed that perpetrators of dating violence needed help.

8. There were significant difference between control schools and treatment schools in mother’s education, wife-and husband-perpetrated spousal violence in the family, response to anger, perceived negative consequences of dating violence, gender stereotyping, awareness of community services for dating abuse perpetrators, and perceptions of peer response to anger. There were no differences between control and treatment schools in dating violence victimization and perpetration outcomes. After controlling for other factors, treatment schools had significantly lower levels of psychological dating violence victimization than public schools.

9. Female students had a higher level of physical/sexual violence perpetration than their male counterparts, after other factors were controlled.

10. Presence in the family of women who hit their husbands increased the risk of dating violence and was one of the independent variables that had the greatest effect on psychological dating violence victimization, physical/sexual dating violence victimization, psychological dating violence perpetration and physical/sexual dating violence perpetration.

11. Public schools had worse dating violence mediating variables and outcomes than private schools. However, type of school was not a significant predictor of dating violence after other factors were controlled.

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